Marianne Durham, DNP, RN, CPPS, CCRN-K

  • Clinical Assistant Professor
Bio

My background is nursing education, patient safety and quality improvement. I've led interprofessional teams searching for solutions to complex problems facing patients and health care organizations. My scholarship pursuit is patient and medication safety and quality improvement in health care.

Current Area of Teaching

I teach the evidence based practice proposal course for the Doctor of Nursing Practice Project and the graduate level quality and safety course.  I was a 2016 Teaching Scholar for the Center for the Advancement of Teaching-Learning Communities at UIC (Spring Semester).

Service / Practice

Instructional Technology Advisory Council, Instructional Technology Advisory Group

Quality Council Committee Member

Strategic Plan Balanced Scorecard Communication Subcommittee Member

Selected Publications

Durham, M. L. & Jankiewicz, A. (In Press). Detecting Medication Administration Errors. Journal of Patient Safety doi:10.1097/PTS.0000000000000384

Durham, M. L., Egan, A., Jankiewicz, A., Murphy, M., Nedved, P., Luvich, R., Goh, A., & Fogg, L. (In Press). Addressing Safe Opioid Monitoring Practices Using an Interprofessional Approach. The Journal of Nursing Administration

Durham, M. L., Suhayda, R., Normand, P., Jankiewicz, A., & Fogg, L. (2016). Reducing Medication Administration Errors in Acute and Critical Care: Multifaceted Pilot Program Targeting RN Awareness and Behaviors. The Journal of Nursing Administration, 46(2), 75-81. doi:10.1097/nna.0000000000000299

Durham, M.L., Swanson, B., & Paulford, N. (1986). The effect of tachypnea on oral temperature estimation: a replication. Nursing Research, 35, 211-214.

Current Research

Improving the safety of medication administration by nurses and patients in different settings is important to prevent harm. Safety strategies for nurses and patients are mindfulness, vigilance for potential error and following steps of the process. My scholarship interest is the effect of variables such as complexity and familiarity on error outcomes.